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AIIA National Conference: Toward Recovery

Mon, 14 Feb 2022
08:00 - 17:00

THE AIIA NATIONAL CONFERENCE WILL NOW BE HELD ON 14 FEBRUARY 2022!

Confirmed Panellists

We'll be announcing more speakers over the coming weeks!

 

Professor Caitlin Byrne FAIIA is Director, Griffith Asia Institute. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute for International Affairs (AIIA) and Faculty Fellow of the University of Southern California's Centre for Public Diplomacy (CPD). Caitlin's research is focused on Australian diplomacy with a special interest in Australia's engagement in the Asia-Pacific region. Most recent research projects explore the role of leadership, soft power and public diplomacy-including people-to-people connections developed through international education, culture and sport-in developing Australia's regional influence, relationships and reputation. Caitlin brings expertise in executive education and currently delivers training on Soft Power & Public Diplomacy, and International Policy & Tradecraft through Australia's Diplomatic Academy in Canberra. She consults on occasion to government in the areas of strategic foreign policy and diplomatic practice. Prior to joining academia, Caitlin had established a professional career spanning strategic management, legal, foreign and social policy roles in government, business and community sectors.

Hayley Channer is the Senior Policy Fellow with the Perth USAsia Centre. Based in Canberra, Hayley produces analysis on foreign and defence policy in the Indo-Pacific, engages with key Australian Government agencies and other policy stakeholders, and builds and sustains the Centre’s network. Hayley has led a diverse career across government, think tanks and the not-for-profit sector. She previously worked for the Department of Defence producing strategic policy guidance on defence capabilities and international engagement with the United States and Japan. She has also worked as an Assistant Adviser to former Minister for Defence, Senator Marise Payne, and coordinated government relations outreach for Australia’s largest non-profit organisation, World Vision. Hayley has published strategic policy analysis on Northeast Asia and US policy in the Indo-Pacific for the Australian Strategic Policy Institute and been a Visiting Fellow with the East West Centre in Washington DC. Hayley is a 2021-22 Fulbright Visiting Scholar and will undertake advanced research into US cooperation with Indo-Pacific allies at the Hudson Institute in 2022. She is also an alumni of the US State Department International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP) and Australia-America Young Leadership Dialogue (AAYLD). Hayley has a Master of International Relations from the University of Queensland and a certificate in Public Policy from the London School of Economics. Hayley is active across the Canberra community having co-founded the Women in Defence and Security Network (WDSN), contributed to the Australia-Japan Youth Dialogue, and volunteered with the RSPCA ACT.

Professor the Hon Gareth Evans AC QC FASSA FAIIA is Distinguished Honorary Professor at the Australian National University, where he was Chancellor from 2010-19. He was a Cabinet Minister in the Hawke and Keating Labor Governments from 1983-96, in the posts of Attorney General, Minister for Resources and Energy, Minister for Transport and Communications and - from 1988-96 - Foreign Minister. During his 21 years in Australian politics he was Leader of the Government in the Senate (1993-96) and Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the House of Representatives (1996-98). From 2000 to 2009 he was President and CEO of the Brussels-based International Crisis Group, the independent global conflict prevention and resolution organisation. He has written or edited 13 books - including Incorrigible Optimist: A Political Memoir (2017), Nuclear Weapons: The State of Play 2015 (co-author), Inside the Hawke-Keating Government: A Cabinet Diary (2014), and The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and for All (2008); has published many newspaper articles and nearly 150 journal articles, chapters, and reports on foreign relations, human rights and legal and constitutional reform; has honorary doctorates from Melbourne, Sydney, Carleton and Queen’s Universities; and has lectured at many universities around the world, including Oxford, Cambridge, Princeton, Yale, Stanford and the Central European University. He has co-chaired two major International Commissions, on Intervention and State Sovereignty (2000-01), and Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (2008-10), and has been a member of a number of others. He currently Co-Chairs the International Advisory Board of the New-York based Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, and is Chair of the Asia Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (APLN) and the Advisory Board of the ANU Centre for Asian-Australian Leadership.

Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly ABC's Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst. He is one of Australia's most respected and awarded journalists, with more than 30 years experience in radio and television news and current affairs. Stan has a strong reputation for independence and integrity and has interviewed international political and business leaders, including our own prime ministers and senior ministers. Prior to taking up his latest role Stan served for a decade at a Senior International Correspondent for CNN in Asia and the Middle East, broadcasting to an audience of millions around the world. He has interviewed numerous world leaders including Nelson Mandela, Hillary Clinton, John Kerry, Condoleezza Rice, Yasser Arafat, Mahmoud Abbas, Shimon Peres, Bill Clinton, and Australian Prime Ministers Bob Hawke, Paul Keating, John Howard, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard, Tony Abbott, and Malcolm Turnbull. Stan has won numerous international and Australian awards including a Peabody Award, Columbia University Alfred I. duPont award, four times winner of the prestigious Asia TV awards including best news story and reporter of the year, twice winner of the coveted Australian Walkley Award, as well as a TV Logie award, GQ Magazine agenda setter of the year and an Australian Academy of Arts Cinema and Television Award (Australia's Oscars) as male TV presenter of the year. Stan is an award winning and best selling author of several books and has contributed articles to many major Australian newspapers, magazines and journals.

Allan Gyngell AO FAIIA was appointed the National President of the Australian Institute of International Affairs (AIIA) in September 2017, having previously been named a Fellow of the AIIA in 2010. He is an honorary professor with the Australian National University’s College of Asia and the Pacific and was most recently Director of the ANU Crawford Leadership Forum. Allan has had an extensive career in Australian international affairs. He was the Director-General of the Australian Office of National Assessments (ONA) from 2009 to 2013. Prior to leading the ONA, he was the founding Executive Director of the Lowy Institute for International Policy from 2003 to 2009. Additionally, he has worked at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, serving as an Australian diplomat in Rangoon, Singapore and Washington. He was Senior Advisor (International) to Prime Minister Paul Keating between 1993 and 1996. Allan was appointed as an Officer in the Order of Australia in 2009 for services to international relations. In 2007, he co-authored Making Australian Foreign Policy with Michael Wesley. His most recent book, Fear of Abandonment: Australia in the World Since 1942, was released in 2017 to considerable acclaim. A new edition of the book was published this year to cover the last six years in Australian foreign policy. 

Bridi Rice is an international development specialist and this year's awardee of the Fulbright Scholarship for Not for Profit Leadership. Bridi holds a Master of Politics, Law Degree and Arts Degree and has worked in international development and foreign policy for 15 years, including as Director at the Australian Council for International Development, co-founder of the Asia Pacific Development Diplomacy and Defence Dialogue and as a senior public servant for the Attorney-General's Department. Bridi is passionate about the intersection of international development, foreign policy and human security - and has just founded a new enterprise: Development Intelligence Lab, a fresh platform for inspiration, ideas and debate on the future of Indo-Pacific development cooperation.

 

Dr Bryce Wakefield is the national executive director of the Australian Institute of International Affairs and a visiting fellow at the Australian National University. He has lived, worked and researched in the United States, Japan, Europe and New Zealand. He trained as a political scientist with particular expertise in International Relations and the international affairs of East Asia. From 2008 to 2012 Bryce was the associate responsible for Northeast Asian programs at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. In this role, he was responsible for conceiving, designing and organising around 60 events in Washington, including policy briefings in the U.S. Congress, on political issues in Australia, Taiwan, North and South Korea and Japan. From 2012 to 2018, he was a tenured lecturer of area studies and international relations at Leiden University in the Netherlands. At Leiden he taught numerous classes on the foreign policy and domestic politics of Japan, the politics of East Asia, comparative politics, and the relationship between politics and culture. During his time as a university academic he also delivered training, induction and briefing sessions for Dutch and international diplomats in the Hague and in Japan. He has been widely quoted in the media, including on the ABC (Australia), the Australian, BBC, Channel News Asia, CNBC, NHK, and the Washington Times. The Tokyo editor of the New York Times named him as one of ten "influential and reliable intellectuals" who could improve relations between the White House and Japan. Bryce lived in Japan from 1998 to 2004 and earned his master’s degree from Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy. He earned his PhD in political studies from the University of Auckland.

 

More Panellist and Keynote Speaker Announcements to Come!

Masterclass speakers

The AIIA will run masterclasses on February 14 for a limited number of tertiary students and early career professionals. Entry will be automatic for #AIIANextGen Network participants and sponsored early-career professionals. General ticket holders may also gain entry to the masterclasses by application. Watch this space for more details.

 Professor Caitlin Byrne FAIIA is Director, Griffith Asia Institute. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute for International Affairs (AIIA) and Faculty Fellow of the University of Southern California's Centre for Public Diplomacy (CPD). Caitlin's research is focused on Australian diplomacy with a special interest in Australia's engagement in the Asia-Pacific region. Most recent research projects explore the role of leadership, soft power and public diplomacy-including people-to-people connections developed through international education, culture and sport-in developing Australia's regional influence, relationships and reputation. Caitlin brings expertise in executive education and currently delivers training on Soft Power & Public Diplomacy, and International Policy & Tradecraft through Australia's Diplomatic Academy in Canberra. She consults on occasion to government in the areas of strategic foreign policy and diplomatic practice. Prior to joining academia, Caitlin had established a professional career spanning strategic management, legal, foreign and social policy roles in government, business and community sectors.

Stephen Dziedzic is the ABC's Foreign Affairs (Asia Pacific) reporter, based in the Parliament House bureau. He covers foreign policy and Australia's relationship with countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Stephen has worked for the ABC since 2007, and spent five years covering federal politics. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Quinlan AO was Australia’s Ambassador to Indonesia from 2018 to 2021.  Prior to that he was Deputy Secretary, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Australia's Senior Official to ASEAN and to the East Asia Summit (2015-2018). He was Acting Secretary of DFAT during 2017.  He was Australia's chief negotiator with Timor-Leste (East Timor) on maritime boundaries (2016-2018). He was Australia’s Ambassador to the United Nations, New York (2009-2015); and Australia's Representative on the United Nations Security Council (2013-2014) and President of the Council in September 2013 and November 2014. He was Senior Adviser to the Prime Minister on Foreign Affairs, Defence and National Security (2008-2009). He has held senior positions in DFAT responsible for North Asia; the Americas; Europe; and in management.  He was in charge of Australia’s operational response to the East Timor crisis in 1999. He was a lead negotiator for Australia in international negotiations on Law of the Sea and on Antarctic matters. His overseas assignments, prior to Ambassador to the United Nations, have been as Deputy Ambassador in the Australian Embassy in Washington DC and as High Commissioner (Ambassador) to Singapore.  And assignments to the Australian Mission to the United Nations, New York; the Australian Permanent Delegation to UNESCO, Paris; and the Australian Embassy, Dublin. He has also served as Chief of Staff and Senior Adviser to the Minister for Resources; the Minister for Industrial Relations; the Minister for Trade; and the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology. Mr Quinlan holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) from the University of Newcastle and an Honorary Doctor of Letters (Newcastle). He was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2016.

Conference Theme: Toward Recovery

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected Australian foreign affairs in a myriad of ways. The pandemic poses new questions for Australia’s role in its region as a responsible development provider. Further, how the region and the world emerge from the pandemic will structure Australia’s economic and strategic developments for decades. The pandemic may represent an unprecedented disruption to world commerce, but its overall effects on the global trading system are unclear. What is clearer is a sharpening of Australia’s strategic environment. The pandemic has accelerated Sino-American competition to underscore power politics rather than rules and norms shaping international order. At the same time, the pandemic has aggravated already existing tensions between Australia and China. Relations between these two countries are at their lowest point since diplomatic normalisation in the 1970s.

The conference will canvas three broad areas:

Regional health recovery and development

What are the prospects for regional health recovery after the pandemic? What role is Australia expected to play in regional health, aid and development initiatives? Are there uniquely Australian approaches to the pandemic that might aid regional recovery?

Trade and Economic Recovery

What has been the impact of the pandemic on global commerce? Are new economic blocs emerging, and if so, where does Australia sit within them? Have issues with vaccine distribution altered the way Australia views supply chain management and resilience? How will international travel recover in the wake of the pandemic. How is Australia contributing to global economic recovery?

Recovery of the International System and Challenges for Australia: An Intergenerational Dialogue

What will the international order look like after COVID? Are we destined for a world where power politics dominates all aspects of the international order, or will “rules-based” approaches survive in important areas? What role will Sino-Australian competition play in Australia’s approach to its region?

Masterclasses

In addition, the AIIA will run masterclasses the day before the conference for a limited number of tertiary students and early career professionals. Keep an eye on the AIIA website for details about the masterclasses.

We will be holding the AIIA National Conference under COVID-safe conditions with limited seating on 14 February 2022. A limited number of early-bird tickets is now available to everyone. Purchase your ticket well in advance to receive a discount. If you are not a member of the AIIA, join up for even more savings.* There are also special discounts for students** and members of the #AIIANextGen Network.***

To become a member of the AIIA, sign up here.

*AIIA Subscribers resident in the Northern Territory and South Australia may also purchase member tickets.

**Student ID will be required on entry to the conference.

***Members of the #AIIANextGen Network will have received an email informing them of membership in the network.

The AIIA reserves the right to review your conference participation and membership any time after you purchase your tickets. If you have bought a discount ticket, but do not meet the criteria for the discount, your ticket may be cancelled and your purchase refunded. The AIIA's decision as to whether you meet the criteria for discounts is final

Cancellation policy

If the conference is cancelled, for example, due to COVID-19, or if COVID restrictions mean you cannot travel interstate to Canberra on 14 February 2022, you will receive a full refund. If you cancel your ticket for any reason up to a month prior to the conference, you will be refunded 75 percent of the cost of your ticket. If you cancel between 14 January 2022 and 7 February 2022, you will be refunded 50 percent of the cost of your ticket. Cancellations later than one week prior to the conference will not receive a refund.

 

Ticket Type Price
Super Early-bird ticket: AIIA members and 2019 attendees ONLY $200.00 Sold out
Super Early-bird Student ticket: AIIA members and 2019 attendees ONLY, Student ID required on entry to the conference $130.00 Sold out
Early-bird non-member ticket (regular price $395) $360.00
Early-bird AIIA member ticket: AIIA members only (regular member's price $260) $230.00
Early-bird Student ticket: (regular student non-member price $190), Student ID required on entry to the conference $160.00
Early-bird Student AIIA Member ticket: (regular student AIIA member's price $155), AIIA members only,Student ID required on entry to the conference $135.00
#AIIANextGen Network ticket: Available only to members of the #AIIANextGen Network. Includes entry into a masterclass on October 17. $85.00
Total: $
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